Steam Boiler

Demineralization plant (D M plant)

In this lesson, we will study Demineralization plant (D M plant). DM plant plays an important role in feed water treatment.

Demineralization plant (D M plant)

Demineralization plant employs a chemical method to separate out the dissolved salt in raw water. But reverse osmosis plant employs a simple physical method to separate the dissolved salts. Before feeding the raw water to these plants sand filtration is done by different filters.
Along with these plants there are two deaerators, which remove dissolved oxygen in the feed water, as traces of oxygen may react with boiler tubes and thereby corrode those. Complete arrangements and inside equipment of these plants are described below.

Boiler feedwater treatment plant
Boiler feedwater treatment plant

The function of demineralization plant is to remove dissolved salt by ion exchange method (chemical method) and there by producing pure feed water for boiler.

 

D M Plant
D M Plant

The salts which make the water hard are generally-chloride, carbonates, bi-carbonates, silicates and phosphates of sodium, potassium, iron, calcium and magnesium. In D M plant there are three types of resin used for boiler feed water treatment process –

Cation exchange resin
Anion exchange resin
Mixed Bed resin

Resins are chemical substances (usually polymers of high molecular weight) used to react with salts and eliminates them by chemical process.
As the name suggests, the cation exchange resin, exchanges the cation

and

anion exchange resin, exchanges anions with the salts dissolved in hard-water.

These mixed bed resins are used in Demineralization plant of boiler feed water treatment, to remove the ions (especially Na+ and SO32-) which may further present in the water after foregoing process of purification.

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